⭐ Lessons for April 20, 2020 ⭐

PE 🏃‍♀️

Arms workout today:

Math ➕➖✖➗

Multiplying numbers larger than 10

I hope you got good at multiplying numbers between 0 and 10 by each other! Today, we are going to learn how to multiply numbers larger than 10 by a number between 2 and 9.

Do you remember what happens when you multiply something by zero?

I hope your answer was ‘you get zero!’

How about when you multiply something by 1?

Yep, it’s the same number.

I also hope you figured out what happens when you multiply something by 10.

10, 20, 30, 40, 50… See the pattern? You just add 0 at the end.

Now that we covered the easy cases, let’s get to real work! Here is the simplest method (according to my mom):

Start by writing our numbers the same way we did when we were adding and subtracting larger numbers (I’m going to use 27 x 2):

2 7

x 3

You are going to start by multiplying 7 by 3:

2 7

x 3

2 1

Now, you are going to add a new line and write 0 under 1:

2 7

x 3

2 1

0

And now multiply the front number, 2, by 3 and write it down under 2:

2 7

x 3

2 1

6 0

The last step will be to add 21 and 60 to each other:

2 7

x 3

2 1

+6 0

=8 1

And now you know that 27 x 3 = 81.

Should we try another example? Let’s see:

1 6

x 5

Here are our steps:

1 6

x 5

3 0

Then:

1 6

x 5

3 0

0

And:

1 6

x 5

3 0

5 0

Finally:

1 6

x 5

3 0

+5 0

=8 0

So now you know: 16 x 5 = 80.

Let’s practice:

Science 🔬

How mountains get created

Mommy has been using her time when we have to stay at home to pretend climb tallest mountain on each continent. We decided that it would be a good idea to discuss those mountains as my science subject over the next two weeks. She insisted that I first learn how mountains get created and that’s our subject for today.

There is one thing I think I should explain before I start talking about mountains, since it’s impossible to talk about creation of mountains without it: tectonic plates. When you look at Earth, it has layers in it. Towards the outside, there is a layer of molten (meaning liquid) rock, covered by solid pieces of rock. Those pieces are huge and they are called tectonic plates. They move around (very, very slowly) on top of the liquid layer.

There are three different ways in which mountains get created. They are:

Volcanic mountains – do you remember me talking about volcanoes? So they get created where two tectonic plates run into each other and the liquid layer comes up. Two of the mountains I will be talking about are volcanoes – Mount Kilimanjaro and Mauna Kea.

Fold mountains – when one tectonic plate gets on top of the other, it creates a higher area, called a mountain range. Top of the area is uneven and has many peaks. Majority of mountains you have heard about were created this way, including Mount Everest and Denali.

Block mountains – these mountains get created where a chunk of a tectonic plate breaks off and gets lifted together. That’s how Sierra Nevada mountains came about.

Social Science 👩‍🎓

This week, I am starting a new series: explorers.

Marco Polo

Marco Polo was born in 1254 in Venice. He traveled around Asia and wrote about his exploration of China. His book, The Book of the Marvels of the World, inspired many others explorers.

Like his dad, Marco Polo was a merchant (see definition under word of the day) and they went together to Asia. This trip lasted 24 years. Venice was at war when Marco Polo came back. The explorer was caught and put in prison. He spent his time telling another prisoner, about his travels in great detail. The other man wrote them down and that’s how his great book got created. Many people read it, learning for the first time about Japan, India and China.

Marco Polo’s family drew maps of his travels based on the book and the stories he told. It included a lot of Asia and even showed the Bering Strait and land on the other side. If you haven’t heard of the Bering Strait – that’s the water between Asia and Alaska. We haven’t talked about Columbus yet, but you may have heard that he got to America in 1492. This means that this map was the first time Europeans showing America even if they didn’t know about it yet!

Prince Henry “The Navigator”

Prince Henry ‘The Navigator’ was the third son of king of Portugal and he was born in 1394. He didn’t travel himself, but he opened navigation school in Portugal and organized many voyages (those are long trips, usually by boat).

Prince Henry ‘The Navigator’ made sailing safer through the school, led to finding of first direct ways of getting from Europe to Asia by sea and started the Age of Discovery.

Trivia ❓

The African tree called baobab can store between 1 000 and 12 000 liters of water in its tree trunk.

Word of the day ❗

Merchant – a person who buys and sells goods especially on a large scale or with foreign countries.

Activity 📺

Visit Machu Picchu:

https://www.youvisit.com/tour/machupicchu?pl=f

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